Katrina Simpson was shocked when she saw a deep scratch on her black 4WD caused by a key.
Katrina Simpson was shocked when she saw a deep scratch on her black 4WD caused by a key. Paul Braven

Grocery trip costs $1500 after vehicle is vandalised

FOR Katrina Simpson, doing the weekly grocery shop means running the risk of having her car damaged.

"It was just three weeks after we bought our Ford Ranger and a simple trip to Coles saw my whole driver's side keyed," she said.

"It's a nice car and someone's just run their keys from back to front along it, probably out of jealously."

Someone's actions cost Mrs Simpson and her husband $1500 to fix and they're not too happy.

"It's that bad that we went to the police about the vandalism but without a witness there's nothing any one can do," she said.

"My husband works really long hours on the island to be able to afford the things we have and he's obviously pissed off about it.

"We even tried those magic corrector pens but we don't want to use a Sharpie on it."

Mrs Simpson said in hindsight she should have, and will now, park away from the front row parks.

"I'm contemplating now whether to just do the shopping online," she said.

"I should be able to drive places in Gladstone without having my property damaged."

A RACQ survey released last week revealed drivers are more likely to have their cars "keyed" than any other act of vandalism.

Keyed refers to someone scraping a key - or other solid object - on the paintwork of a vehicle.

About 45% of the state's motorists have had their pride and joy attacked by key-mad mischief-makers.

Windscreen wreckers come in second at 16.3% and panel kickers cause the third most frequent form of damage at 9%.

Those surveyed also revealed a list of bizarre attacks, including sugar in fuel tanks, paint stripper poured over a car and a car being reversed over by a larger vehicle.

RACQ Insurance communications executive manager Mike Sopinski said one in five Queensland motorists - or 18% - had had their car vandalised.

Mr Sopinski said 3% of Queenslanders had their cars vandalised in the past 12 months.

"These acts of vandalism are mostly random attacks and often the offender or offenders aren't identified," Mr Sopinski said.

"In some cases, given the nature of damage to the car, personal reasons are suspected as motivation."



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