THE POLICIES: GAPDL chairman Peter Corones and Family First candidate Diane Hancock-Mills at the Meet the Candidate luncheon yesterday.
THE POLICIES: GAPDL chairman Peter Corones and Family First candidate Diane Hancock-Mills at the Meet the Candidate luncheon yesterday. Brenda Strong

Candidates recieve mixed reviews

WHOEVER wins the seat of Flynn in the Federal election will have a “heck” of a job.

Gladstone Area Promotions and Development Limited chairman Peter Corones said the person elected in Saturday’s Federal election would have a big task ahead of them representing the region which currently has about 50,000 people and 50 per cent of the state’s resource projects.

He said Gladstone would become a 21st century model industrial region.

“It’s a heck of a responsibility for the sitting member,” Mr Corones said.

Mr Corones was speaking at yesterday’s Meet the Candidates forum, where about 80 Gladstone region business people, political party members, Gladstone Regional councillors and members of the community listened to speeches made by the candidates.

GAPDL, the host and organising body of the forum, invited all six candidates running for the Federal seat of Flynn. However, two candidates – independent Duncan Scott and Democratic Labor Party’s John McMahon – were unable to make it.

Each candidate at the forum – Labor’s Chris Trevor, Liberal National Party candidate Ken O’Dowd, Greens’ Anne Goddard and Family First’s Di Hancock-Mills – were given 15 minutes to speak to the crowd about their future vision for the Gladstone region.

After the speeches, the four candidates were subjected to anonymous questions asked by forum attendees.

From health and the hospital to apprentice training, liquefied natural gas developments and the environment, all four candidates answered questions to the best of their ability, however, some people believed they all failed to tackle numerous of issues.

“It’s unfortunate that none of the candidates considered international affairs and its affects on Gladstone and its industry,” attendee Andrew Wallace said.

Russell Redenback was disappointed with the candidates and felt that they didn’t really say much except “reflect and tow the party line”.

“You don’t want to know what I think,” said one attendee.

Even though some attendees were disappointed with the candidates, others were happy and impressed with the issues raised as well as the way the candidates wrestled with those issues.

“It was an interesting discussion,” Nicole Carnovale said. “I was glad to hear from all four of the candidates and their views on some very important issues that Gladstone is facing.”

All four candidates looked uncomfortable on the podium with facial expressions often giving away their feelings.

Greens’ candidate Anne Goddard was visibly sweating during question time and it looked like the Liberal National endorsed candidate Ken O’Dowd couldn’t wait to leave.

Family First candidate Di Hancock-Mills gave an old analogy of the tax system that’s been doing the rounds for months and Chris Trevor looked agitated at certain times.

Attendee Jodie Luce said it was nice to hear all the candidates at the same time.

“The policies were what I was interested in and it was good hear each candidate’s opinions,” she said.

Maxine Brushe said it was a great opportunity to hear the views of the candidates while Matt Burnett said that all four candidates were very good.



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