Why you should never look a yowie in the eye

YOWIE hunters across Australia have weighed into the debate about a "hairy-man" that reportedly pushed a woman down a hill in Cairns almost three decades ago.

The unnamed resident's yowie encounter on Red Hill in Woree has been discussed at length on the Yowiehunters Forum - the biggest online yowie and bigfoot community, established in 1997.

One theory to come to the fore is reminiscent of the age-old proverb "never smile at a crocodile", except with yowies and making eye contact.

The mystery of the Red Hill yowie is an riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma — but perhaps there is a key. QUOTE: Winston Churchill. PICTURE: HARRY AND THE HENDERSONS (1987) / ENTERTAINMENT FILMS
The mystery of the Red Hill yowie is an riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma — but perhaps there is a key. QUOTE: Winston Churchill. PICTURE: HARRY AND THE HENDERSONS (1987) / ENTERTAINMENT FILMS

 

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Yowie attacks Queensland driver

Yowie threw me down a hill

 

"Seems the hairy ones aren't so keen on eye contact …" theorised user Yowie Bait.

Another hunter surmised the simple it-doesn't-like-eye-contact explanation was too simple.

"It would have been far easier for it to flee and hide in such contested an area," user Bassplyr posted.

"Humans likely hike trails over that small hill daily due to its location.

"Again, it's probably smart enough of a creature to understand that the area wasn't a place to contest as territory or call home.

"However, in this circumstance fleeing wasn't much of a viable option either.

"Daylight. Too many humans out and about.

"It probably needed to rely on not being detected to get through the day."

This new hunch supposed the generally gentle creature was left with a fight-or-flight quandary when it became obvious the woman had spotted it.

"In a situation like this where it cant run but also cant be found out, it left the yowie in a dilemma," the yowie hunter conjectured.

"What to do with the witness.

"I believe it thought about it briefly before deciding to dispatch the witness so that his presence would remain unknown."

Yowies: Not to be confused with the bunyip (pictured) a fabled creature of the Australian outback thought to drown humans.
Yowies: Not to be confused with the bunyip (pictured) a fabled creature of the Australian outback thought to drown humans.

Unfortunately (by this line of reasoning) the yowie "screwed up" for the third time that day - first being stuck on the hillside during the day, second being detected.

"It knocked the fleeing witness down the hill and towards a location that, if it continued to pursue, would have made the yowie's situation worse and the odds of remaining undetected much harder," the hunter wrote.

"It had no choice but to abandon its attempt.

"It probably then had to make the choice.

"Wait for nightfall and hope the humans wouldn't return in mass like they're known to do.

"Or take the risk and egress out to the rainforest in daylight.

"Either way it's likely the yowie was having a rotten day."

A case of mistaken identity? PICTURE: HARRY BRUCE
A case of mistaken identity? PICTURE: HARRY BRUCE

Another user, going by the pseudonym Bluedog, had some local knowledge to share.

"Having lived in Cairns, I can say that the city backs right up to the rainforest and mountains," he said.

"The rainforest is incredibly thick and dense in places and is probably better described as jungle.

"There are valleys and gorges in Far North Queensland that I'm sure no human has ever set foot.

"Perfect habitat to remain hidden with relatively little human contact."

 

Was Ted Prior’s Grug a yowie? No. He was a haystack with legs, or something.
Was Ted Prior’s Grug a yowie? No. He was a haystack with legs, or something.

Bluedog believed there were many more unreported encounters in the area, especially up in the hills where conspiratorial locals kept the truth under wraps.

"In Kuranda I think it's a bit of a locals' secret that they don't talk to outsiders about," he wrote.

"Yowies could comfortably live relatively close to Cairns and remain undetected."



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