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Brett Peter Cowan lodges appeal against murder conviction

THE man found guilty of murdering Daniel Morcombe has lodged his appeal against conviction.

Brett Peter Cowan, 44, has lodged the documents with the Court of Appeal registry this afternoon with a few days to spare before the cut-off date.

Cowan was convicted of murder, indecently dealing with a child and interfering with a corpse on Thursday March 13 in the fifth week of a trial.

He had one calendar month to appeal the verdict.

It is believed he will be appealing based on decisions made during pre-trial hearings, specifically the admissibility of Cowan's confessions to covert police and publicity about the case before and during the trial.

Cowan is also expected to argue the justice misdirected the jury, witnesses who knew Douglas Jackway should have been called and other perceived issues during the trial.

There were two mistrial applications during the trial - one related to a Courier Mail front page headline and the other about a potentially prejudicial note left at a memorial site to Daniel that the jury might have seen.

Cowan was found guilty of taking Daniel Morcombe from beneath the Kiel Mountain Rd overpass on December 7, 2003, indecently touching him and then dumping his body in Glasshouse Mountains bushland after killing him through a chokerhold.

He maintained he fabricated the story he told undercover police in Western Australia during an elaborate sting.

The Attorney-General has already lodged an appeal arguing Cowan's sentence - life imprisonment with a 20-year non-parole period - was manifestly inadequate.

Jarrod Bleijie said 20 years, though higher than the mandatory 15 years, was not in line with community expectations and did not set an adequate deterrent.

Topics:  appeal brett peter cowan court crime daniel morcombe murder



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