LISTEN: 'Fireball meteor' causes tremor in 'super sonic boom'

ONE of Australia's leading professors in astrophysics has said that a "fireball meteor" penetrated the earth's atmosphere, coming near Gladstone last night.

Professor Michael Drinkwater said the fireball was "larger than usual" as people reported hearing sounds and vibrations, which isn't usually the case.

"I think this was a fireball. That's a really bright meteor," Prof Drinkwater said.

LISTEN | Prof Drinkwater explain why it was a "fireball" and debunks the myths

"This one would have been larger than usual if people heard sounds or vibrations as has been reported.

"Meteors typically are only visible when they are still very high, 50 to 120km in altitude.

"It's well above the speed of sounds, so it will create powerful super sonic boom or shockwaves." 

AS IT HAPPENED | 

>>'Boom': Tremors felt as 'meteor' crashes near Gladstone

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Debunking theories that the "bright light" could have been space junk, Prof Drinkwater said space junk doesn't catch on fire as it's moving much slower.

"I don't think it is space junk as fireballs are much more common, and also space junk is not normally so bright as it is moving much slower," he said.



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