MAKING TRACKS: Mike Gobels with a drawing of the old track over the Many Peaks Range
MAKING TRACKS: Mike Gobels with a drawing of the old track over the Many Peaks Range Greg Bray

FLASHBACK: Boyne Valley settlers made tracks over old trails

THE SETTLERS of the Boyne Valley weren't trailblazers, they were trail followers.

Mike Gobel from Gayndah discussed the importance of the trails at the recent Boyne Burnett Inland Rail Trail meeting.

Mike was delighted to find a map of the trails on display.

"Today Mr Jim Harris bought along a map of the old sketch of the original map of the first pathway the European settlers followed.

"The majority of modern roads were built over those old tracks."

Mr Gobel added that when European settlers arrived in the area they found that getting around was, "Easy peasy."

"They just followed the existing native trails," he said.

"The road over the range from Many Peaks to Monto is actually an Aboriginal pathway.

"It's part of the original Dalgangal road that ran from Boompa just west of Maryborough up to Tannum Sands.

"It encompasses a lot of groups, it would have been huge because it took people from the north over the Dawes Range and they would have met up with people from the Bunya area and Fraser Island."

 

PATHFINDERS: Mike Gobels with a sketch of the old pathways the settlers followed into the Boyne Valley.
PATHFINDERS: Mike Gobels with a sketch of the old pathways the settlers followed into the Boyne Valley. Greg Bray

A Gooreng Gooreng spokesperson said there were three main tribes along the path.

"The Wakka Wakka, Gubbi Gubbi and Gooreng Gooreng used it for trade and ceremonies," she said.

"There could also be marriage and kinship structures, but a lot of ceremonies were based around seasons and trade.

"Groups carried message sticks with them on the trail, which were like passports and only certain people could carry them."

The spokesperson said one of the biggest festivals that tribes gathered at was the bunya nut harvest which occurred every three years.

"Some groups came from a long way, tribes covered a lot of distance to come to those ceremonies," she said.

"Every group or clan that came was given as a token a bunya seed or sapling to take home.

"You'll find bunya pines all along those tracks and you'll see them at Barney Point beach which was another important ceremonial site."



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