A woman with her shopping bags after spending up before Christmas.
A woman with her shopping bags after spending up before Christmas.

Aussies rush to offload unwanted presents

Australians won't be wasting any time offloading their unwanted Christmas gifts in return for some fast cash.

Left with more than $18 million in gifts they want to get rid of this festive season, many will

list them for sale online.

New research from online classifieds website Gumtree found last Christmas 54 per cent of people received at least one unwanted Christmas present.

And the dud gifts were worth a decent amount of money - the average value was $87.

The research found among the most unwanted gifts was incorrectly-sized clothes (31 per cent), personal care products (25 per cent), books (13 per cent) and household items including furniture, decor and homewares (10 per cent).

Gumtree's spokeswoman Amanda Behre said selling unwanted items online was a good way to make some quick money, particularly for those left with hefty Christmas bills.

"It's one of our busiest times of year for people selling their items," she said.

"Post-Christmas we see about a 293 per cent uplift from Boxing Day through to the 29th of December of people listing new things and unwanted gifts."

Many Australians will be jumping online to offload their unwanted Christmas gifts.
Many Australians will be jumping online to offload their unwanted Christmas gifts.

Ms Behre said there are plenty of good deals to be had for shoppers looking to snap up competitive deals.

"The morning of Boxing Day and quite often through until the evening is the peak time for people listing and going to search items," she said.

Ms Behre said among the top items listed at this time of year was electronic goods including iPads, Apple watches and gaming consoles, followed by home and garden items including barbecues, tables and decor.

Consumer finance expert Lisa Montgomery said while many people would rush to offload gifts, "let's not forget the spirit of Christmas".

"It's the intention of giving that we shall value," she said.

"But what it does do is trigger us to look at gifts that we don't use in our home that we can make some money out of.

"We are a society that consumes."

The main drivers for people dishing out unwanted gifts is because they are on a limited budget (30 per cent) and they don't want to spend cash (15 per cent).

And the worst gift givers are typically mates (32 per cent), parents (22 per cent), work colleagues (21 per cent) and siblings (17 per cent).

sophie.elsworth@news.com.au

@sophieelsworth



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