Campers have been shown to be happier, feel closer to their partners and children and less stressed by new research. In the hammock is Dale Johnson 26 of North Shore with behind, Rodney and Karen Johnson and twin kids Brooke and Steven 15yo of Yeppoon with Cassandra Popp (pink Top) 24yo of North Shore.
Campers have been shown to be happier, feel closer to their partners and children and less stressed by new research. In the hammock is Dale Johnson 26 of North Shore with behind, Rodney and Karen Johnson and twin kids Brooke and Steven 15yo of Yeppoon with Cassandra Popp (pink Top) 24yo of North Shore.

Are you a ‘happy camper’ or not?

THE TERM ‘happy camper’ is far more than just words and this has been quantified by research which shows all Gladstone residents who go camping will get mental health and wellbeing benefits.

The entire Central Queensland region has a plethora of amazing destinations, from Curtis Island to Kroombit Tops, Agnes Water to Yeppoon.

Gladstone Regional Council has reopened council managed campgrounds, so there is no better time to get out and explore the wilderness.

So today, on R U OK Day, Central Queenslander’s are being encouraged to harness the healing powers of getting out among nature and camping with friends and family.

R U OK Day is the national day of action dedicated to reminding Australians to ask one another whether they are OK and support those who are struggling.

This year so far has had the most impact in recent history on society and mental health, according to research by Beyond Blue, who have developed a web page to assist everyone.

Research commissioned by the Caravan Industry Association of Australia proves that campers are really happy, with 96 per-cent of campers believing the activity can make you happy.

Calliope River free camp. Picture: Rodney Stevens
Calliope River free camp. Picture: Rodney Stevens

The research showed 56 per-cent of campers are happy, compared to 29 per-cent of non campers, while 52 per-cent feel energised, as opposed to 28 per-cent of non campers.

Pitching a tent or towing a caravan to the bush, or campground, also has relationship benefits, the research found.

Some 85 per-cent of campers felt closer to their partner or spouse compared to 65 per-cent of non campers, while 75 per-cent of campers feel closer to their children and only 63 per-cent of non campers felt the same.

Stress levels, boredom and loneliness also are increased in non-campers.

Just 12 per-cent of campers reported being stressed as opposed to 21 per-cent of non campers who were surveyed.

Only three per-cent of campers said they felt lonely, as opposed to 15 per-cent of non campers, and while 18 per-cent of non campers said they were bored, just 10 per-cent of campers did.

For anyone who needs any help or advice on mental health issues, it is widely available.

Visit the Beyond Blue website or the R U OK website for more information.

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