We’ve found five of the most beautiful spots in the state where travel-hungry teens and grey nomads could fill thousands of vacancies.
We’ve found five of the most beautiful spots in the state where travel-hungry teens and grey nomads could fill thousands of vacancies.

APPLY NOW: The jobs in paradise up for grabs

Jobs in paradise are going begging with the young and old being urged to take a gap year in their own backyard.

The Courier-Mail has found five of the most beautiful spots in the state where travel-hungry teens and grey nomads could lend a hand to businesses struggling to fill thousands of vacancies.

From ginger picking on the Sunshine Coast to working on white, sandy beaches on the Great Barrier Reef's Green Island, bosses are pleading for staff - with no experience needed in some cases.

Growcom's Regional Agriculture Workforce Officer Blair Brown said the lack of employees has hurt the industry but Australians looking for adventure can get it while working and exploring regional Queensland.

"Our lost crop register is over $50 million and that's the tip of the iceberg, that's $50 million worth of produce from 70 odd growers who answered the survey, I could probably name 10 million off the top of my head from guys that I know," Mr Brown said.

"(But) we don't want people to pity this industry, it has been around for a long time and will be around for a long time to come, we want to appeal to people who want to reconnect with land, food and adventure.

"Rather than going to France to be an Au Pair we want you to travel to Mareeba to do mangoes or to Warwick to do wagyus and rodeos."

 

More than 35,000 jobs across a variety of sectors including hospitality, farming, manufacturing and health are currently available on Seek.

This is almost the largest ever number of job advertisements for Queensland on the employment platform.

 

Emily Lowther, 24, from Perth, Jeremy Saliou, 30, from France and Valentina Trincucci, 28, from Italy, trimming ginger at Templetons Ginger at Eumundi. Picture: Lachie Millard.
Emily Lowther, 24, from Perth, Jeremy Saliou, 30, from France and Valentina Trincucci, 28, from Italy, trimming ginger at Templetons Ginger at Eumundi. Picture: Lachie Millard.

 

Australia's biggest Ginger producer, Templeton Ginger, is just 20 minutes from Noosa Beach, and is looking for forty workers for their next sowing period in July.

Kylie Templeton, the commercial director at the Eumundi-based farm, said it's sad to not see Australian university leavers come through for a long time.

"I mean gosh you can easily have that adventure you're looking for overseas in Australia, you can enjoy the beaches, surfing, markets, the Hinterland behind us there is just so many things to do," she said.

"If you get paid to travel and have great adventures and meet new people, Australia has that to offer."

Lewis McGlynn, Green Island Resort Restaurant Manager.
Lewis McGlynn, Green Island Resort Restaurant Manager.

One of Australia's most idyllic locations - Green Island, which is located off the coast of Cairns, is struggling to find staff even though snorkelling is allowed on breaks.

Green Island Resort's general manager Sue O'Donnell said the positions usually taken by backpackers were the hardest to fill.

"We can't fill the positions, we can't open up the whole resort permanently as we used to because we just don't have the staff the guests need," she said.

"The staff can snorkel in their breaks or after work, they can go swimming, the island is absolutely beautiful and has a rainforest on it."

Venturing inland to Queensland's vast outback, stations and roadhouses are also screaming for workers, with the opportunity to fly in helicopters , learn how to ride motorbikes and horses and work on the land with animals all up for grabs.

Kacie and Ardie Lord from Lord Pastoral.
Kacie and Ardie Lord from Lord Pastoral.

Kacie Lord from Lord Pastoral said working on a station could be "life-changing" and told the story of a French man who stepped out of his comfort zone in a Sydney cafe to Richmond, north west Queensland.

"He was sick for the first three days from the heat but he kept saying "I'd be right, I'd be right," so four years later he is still here," she said.

"He has his own team of dogs, his own motorbike, he has his own area that he manages and is passionate about what he does."

Chamber of Commerce and Industry Queensland general manager policy and advocacy Amanda Rohan backed the idea of having a gap year locally, saying the peak business body was a big fan of working and playing in your own backyard.

"We know backpackers for example will spend months in regions living and working and enjoying the sites," she said.

"We've got this opportunity to really stimulate this type of approach … and I can say there would be jobs going across the state."

Ms Rohan said further incentives for this approach should be looked at.

 

 

 

Originally published as APPLY NOW: The jobs in paradise up for grabs



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