Woorabinda kids share culture



THIRTY nine Woorabinda kids bouncing with energy tumbled out of a bus at Tannum Sands State High School yesterday.

Years 5 to 7 pupils from Woorabinda ? an Aboriginal community three hours west of Gladstone ? travelled to Tannum Sands as part of a cultural exchange in memory of Jumbo Johnson.

Jumbo died a couple of years ago in a car crash but had been an important member of Gladstone's community.

Jumbo's mother Neola Savage is a community elder and teacher at Woorabinda and Tannum High teacher Pierce Brown, a close friend of Jumbo's, made his dream happen.

'He came round and we had a chat about it. It seemed trivial at the time but it's worked out to mean so much,' Pierce said.

'It's been great. My kids have loved it. It was his idea and conception of combining the cultures and we've done it in his memory.'

For the Woorabinda kids it's a smorgasboard of fun including physical education, rocket science, a rock concert, break dancing and Piccaninny Island dancers.

But Neola said the trip also had an educational purpose.

'It's important for our kids to have mainstream contact and for Tannum to get to know our kids,' Neola said.

'They need basic education at primary school so they can achieve at high school.



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