Texting may be accident in waiting



A GLADSTONE resident admitted her text messaging while driving caused an accident but it she's not alone.

Nearly half of Central Queenslanders said they used their mobile phones without hands free kits while driving, according to research by insurer AAMI.

The woman involved in the accident is one of a quarter of Gladstone residents who send and receive text messages while driving.

'I ran up the bum of someone,' she said.

'I was scared. It wasn't high speed. Nobody was hurt but still.

'It just shows that it could have been a lot worse. I was just lucky.'

However the woman paid little attention to her scare. 'It stopped me for the first month or so,' she said.

'I don't text when I'm driving any more. I definitely do it a lot less. "I don't ring people and just chat. But I will occasionally answer just for convenience.'

Convenience was one of the major reasons AAMI attributed the high statistics for people using mobile phones while driving despite the potential consequences.

Despite new state laws introduced in January 2004 which impose a $225 fine and a loss of three demerit points, drivers refuse to stop talking.

Queensland Transport statistics reveal 61,537 road users between August 2000 and October 2005 have been booked for talking on a mobile or texting while driving.

After experiencing an accident from her texting, the woman could only put drivers' actions down to naivety.

'Because they don't think they're going to crash,' she said.



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