Images won?t stop smokers



A FOUL image of a cancerous mouth and teeth so rotten you can almost smell them may not deter smokers.

Graphic health warnings will be included on all cigarette packets from today but Abby Brumby for one doubts the images will be motivation enough for her to stop smoking.

'They're graphic and a bit intimi- dating,' Ms Brumby said.

"It would probably scare me off a bit but because it's an addiction it would probably take more than a picture.'

The 23-year-old wondered whether the photos were worthwhile. "They're doing it for a good rea- son,'' Ms Brumby said.

'But you sort of want them to spend it on other things to help smokers.'

Ms Brumby has been smoking for about three years and has tried to quit once previously, unsuccessfully. "It was because of the cost,' Ms Brumby said.

'It probably lasted a month if that.'

Ms Brumby said if she was going to quit now it would be for family or money reasons.

The explicit warnings of smoking health consequences on cigarette packets from today were introduced after research showed the current warnings were ineffective.

The labels will encourage the 80 per cent of smokers who want to quit to stop the habit, according to the health coalition.

The health coalition believed the labels would encourage smokers to take more responsibility for their health.

The phasing in of anti-smoking laws in indoor areas means from July 2006 all indoor areas will be 100 per cent smoke free.

Smokers who light up in these areas can be fined.



Healthy Harbour report: Are we getting the whole story?

Healthy Harbour report: Are we getting the whole story?

The Healthy Harbour report is flawed, says engineer.

Welcome to The Observer's new-look website

Welcome to The Observer's new-look website

You will notice a cleaner, more modern look here at The Observer.

Servo's fuel price shocks Tannum Sands community

Servo's fuel price shocks Tannum Sands community

Should unleaded cost more than 150 cents per litre?

Local Partners