Ashes interred between graves

By GLEN PORTEOUSglenp@gladstoneobserver.dyndns.org

THERE have been some concerns recently about the final resting place of ashes in the Lawn Section at Port Curtis Cemetery.

In a situation that is unique to Gladstone, the Gladstone City Council (GCC) has decided to allow the interment of ashes be- tween full body graves.

While the cemetery has a columbarium wall for ashes to be placed in a single space, with garden sites also available, the clay- based soil has forced the council to rethink how the plots are spaced in the front section close to the car park.

Manager of environmen- tal services, Ron Doherty, said:

'The clay soil has made it unstable for side- by-side burial and we can only bury full interment in every alternate space.''

One of the concerns raised was when the sides are excavated they might fall in and collapse.

However if the burial of alternative spaces is used then in between each plot the interment of up to four ashes can be buried there as they only require a small excavation.

The location of the burial of ashes away from the next available space requires more attention by the staff in areas such as mowing, until grass cover is re-established and in most cases top dressing is required.

Also in a GCC report, it states the council's current policy does not allow reser-vations of plots or graves for normal burials at the Port Curtis Cemetery.

This does not include double interment if re- quested.



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