BHP President Minerals Australia Edgar Basto (centre) with apprentices (L-R) Max Napper Tom Kase, Catherine Mosie and Milena Andrejic at BHP's Blackwater mine in Central Queensland. Picture: Daryl Wright
BHP President Minerals Australia Edgar Basto (centre) with apprentices (L-R) Max Napper Tom Kase, Catherine Mosie and Milena Andrejic at BHP's Blackwater mine in Central Queensland. Picture: Daryl Wright

1025 BHP apprentice, traineeship spots available in CQ

MINING giant BHP has pledged to create about 1250 apprenticeships and traineeships at its FutureFit Academy in Mackay.

About 225 people have already enrolled at the facility since it opened in May, leaving 1025 spots up for grabs.

The academy uses nationally recognised courses of studies for trade apprenticeships and maintenance traineeships.

It is expected to help boost Australia's skills base and create new career pathways into the mining sector.

BHP president of minerals Australia Edgar Basto said the company had committed to create 3500 new trainee and apprentice positions over the next five years.

BHP President Minerals Australia Edgar Basto with apprentices at BHP's Blackwater mine in Central Queensland. Picture: Daryl Wright
BHP President Minerals Australia Edgar Basto with apprentices at BHP's Blackwater mine in Central Queensland. Picture: Daryl Wright

"Our nearly $800 million skills and training package will create thousands of new jobs across Australia, and boost employment and business opportunities in the national METS sector," Mr Basto said.

"We'll be creating 2500 new apprenticeships and traineeships through BHP's FutureFit Academy, 1250 of those new apprenticeships will be in Central Queensland.

"Creating new opportunities for Australians of all ages and all walks of life will help Australia bounce back and keep the economy strong."

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New BHP FutureFit Academy trainees Whitney Cross and Lee Goodall try out the virtual reality training technology. Picture: supplied
New BHP FutureFit Academy trainees Whitney Cross and Lee Goodall try out the virtual reality training technology. Picture: supplied

BHP chief executive Mike Henry said the mining industry had an important role to play as the country begins to rebuild its economy.

"The mining and METS sector is a critical pillar of our economy, and it has never been more important than now," Mr Henry said.

"These investments will create a pipeline of future talent in highly skilled roles, working in an industry that delivers essential products to the world and generates export dollars that keep the Australian economy strong."

First year heavy vehicle apprentice Catherine Hosie said she was enjoying her learning environment.

"It's definitely the best environment I've worked in, everyone gets along with everybody, everybody is so friendly and caring, everyone looks after each other," she said.

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