Entertainment

The Whitlams are back to play at Flix in the Stix

The Whitlams are back on tour, journeying from region to region for Optus Flix in the Stix 2013.
The Whitlams are back on tour, journeying from region to region for Optus Flix in the Stix 2013. Contributed

REMEMBER these lyrics: "There's no aphrodisiac like loneliness"? For many, these words are an unmistakable link to renowned late '90s piano-driven pop band The Whitlams.

After a two-year break, Tim Freedman and The Whitlams, including Jak Housden on guitar, Warwick Hornby on bass and Terepai Richmond on drums, are to play at Optus Flix in the Stix 2013.

The band will be entertaining in Gladstone on Saturday, April 27 at Tondoon Botanic Gardens.

The Australian group originally formed in 1992 as a three-piece with no drummer.

The group consisted of Tim Freedman, Stevie Plunder and Andy Lewis.

During 1993 and 1994 they played at more than 300 shows.

Now, living in a world of dance pop, alternative Triple J electro hits and hip-hop boy bands, The Whitlams are still thought of as one of Australia's most loved bands - especially singer-song writer and piano player Tim Freedman.

Knowing all too well about fame and the music touring industry, Freedman boasts six albums with a compilation of hits including No Aphrodisiac, Blow Up the Pokies and Beauty In Me.

Freedman said getting to know The Whitlams was certainly something that impacted his life.

"That was always pretty magic," he said.

Asked if he felt he had impacted others' lives, he humbly said: "I get the occasional note."

After two years not touring, Freedman said he was looking forward to Optus Flix in the Stix.

"We used to tour regional towns a lot," he said. "I think people in the country like to not feel isolated and they are very enthusiastic when you take the trouble."

Freedman has toured Canada, Ireland and played solo in London, among other endeavours.

"I think when you're overseas it's exciting," he said.

Driving through the Irish countryside was a highlight of one of his trips.

These days Freedman can be found playing solo around various Australian jazz bars but he is putting that aside and playing with The Whitlams this year.

For the gifted singer, life sounds demanding but he says his current life is not busy at all.

"I took my foot off the pedal a few years ago," he said.

"This tour is perfect because we just play weekends and I can still do the school run.

"I get to see the family and go on a road trip with my mates on the weekend, so it's a good balance."

Freedman seems to be enjoying being a fatherly figure to his seven-year-old daughter.

"I'm teaching her the piano; she's pretty good," he said.

"I like to see her enjoying it."

We used to tour regional towns a lot. I think people in the country like to not feel isolated and they are very enthusiastic when you take the trouble.

As for his current album, Australian Idle, Freedman said the songs were more about growing old gracefully.

Something Freedman is thriving at himself, if you check out his latest photos.

"I like to write songs about things that haven't been written before," Freedman said.

"I wrote about the Olympics first and East Timor first."

Growing up with a DJ as a father in the 60s, Freedman was always in close proximity to music.

"I learnt piano when I was 5 or 6 from a lady down the street," he said.

It wasn't until he was about 23 that he finally noted his talent and took his music seriously.

A master of his art, Freedman writes songs that paint vivid snapshots of life.

"I like a song that can be played with a single instrument that tells a story," he said.

Freedman said every audience was individual.

"It's good to work them out and give them what they want."

Topics:  entertainment, flix in the stix, music, the whitlams




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