News

Man hears how driving on ice changed a woman's life

He drove high on ice.
He drove high on ice.

KRISTAL Johnston's voice barely wavered as she told a Rockhampton courtroom how the actions of one man changed her life, after he made the foolish decision to drive while high on methamphetamines.

That man, Mathew Pinch, cried throughout his appearance in Rockhampton's Supreme Court, where he pleaded guilty to trafficking drugs, possessing items and dangerous operation of a motor vehicle causing grievous bodily harm.

Since October 9 2014 Miss Johnston has been paying for the consequences of Pinch's decision to drive while he was high on ice, which he became addicted to while working on Curtis Island.

Justice Duncan McMeekin said he was the third person that week he had dealt with who told him they became addicted to ice while working on Curtis Island.

"The simple fact is, as grievous as Miss Johnston's injuries are, it's a miracle you didn't kill her, someone else, or yourself," he said.

The court heard that Pinch had been driving for around 35 minutes before he reached the Gladstone-Benaraby Rd around 5.30am, crossed to the wrong side of the road, and ploughed into Miss Johnston's car.

Crown prosecutor Joshua Phillips told the court the doctor who did Pinch's blood test said he had the second highest drug reading he had ever seen in a living driver.

Miss Johnston, 33, was working as a firefighter in Gladstone and was up for a promotion to station officer and was also a gifted athlete before the accident, competing in rugby league, squash, body sculpting and marathon running.

Her physical injuries- which led to an extended stay in the intensive care unit, two surgeries on her knee and extensive rehabilitation- have meant she has been unable to progress in her career.

She also had to postpone her wedding because she and her partner had to use their savings to cover her medical bills, and postpone having children because carrying a baby would be detrimental to her knee injury.

She got emotional as she told the court experts have predicted she may never return to her pre-trauma ability.

"Mathew. I am a good person, I am an innocent person, and your actions have impacted on my life, my family's lives and my friend's lives," she said.

"I understand you were under the influence of illicit drugs at the time of the accident. I also understand that addiction is a disease.

"It is my request that you access rehabilitation so you don't hurt or jeopardise the lives of anyone else."

Defence barrister Maree Willey said Pinch moved to Gladstone from Victoria in February 2013 to work at Curtis Island and began to use meth to stay awake, after finding the work stressful and demanding.

"Prior to working on Curtis Island he was not a user of drugs," she said.

Pinch resigned in July 2014 and received a payout, but after the money ran out he was approached by associates from his work about becoming a middle man in their drug operation.

For around a month or two he was involved in that trafficking operation, making no financial profit but taking some drugs for himself instead.

He also exchanged some meth for stolen property, including a camera and firearms.

He was sentenced to three years jail for trafficking, one year for possession and four and a half years for dangerous driving, to be served concurrently.

The sentence will be suspended after serving 18 months, with an operational period of five years.

His license was also disqualified absolutely.

Topics:  crime, gladstone, gladstonecourt, gladstonemagistratescourt, rockhampton




Stay Connected

Update your news preferences and get the latest news delivered to your inbox.

'My husband lasted 6 weeks as a stay at home dad'

APN Hey Mummy Feature for online - stock images. Katie Dykes being interviewed for the webisodes. Photo Marc Stapelberg / The Northern Star

FROM the outside, being a stay at home mum looks like a breeze.

THE EXPERT: Stop judging working mothers

SUPER MUMS: Being a working mums comes down to perfecting time management.

"WORKING for money is all right; so is working because you want to.”

OPINION: How to prepare your child for day care

Your kids will love childcare, but it may take some adjusting.

GETTING your child ready for day care is vital.

Health and nutrition with kids - how do you balance it?

HOW important is health and nutrition in your household?

Smack or no smack - where do you stand?

THE debate is reignited - is smacking acceptable?

Technology and kids: Do you ever cut their wi-fi?

Check out our new video series featuring mums having a chat

LETTER: How I realised voting is important

What was said to me had real purpose and genuine gratitude behind it

Iconic CBD buildings featured in new public art project

Gladstone artist Geoff Head created the ten linocuts of Gladstone buildings that are now on Goondoon St.

The project aims to liven up the Gladstone CBD

Drink driver caught on the Bruce Hwy overnight

A Casino woman has appeared in court over drink driving charges.

He returned a blood alcohol reading of .102

Latest deals and offers

Panic inside Istanbul Airport

Turkish police block the road after an suicide bomb attack at Ataturk Airport in Istanbul, Turkey, 28 June 2016. At least 10 people were killed in two separate explosions that hit Ataturk Airport.

Dramatic vision from inside Istanbul airport after explosin.

Public art at Goondoon St

Gladstone artist Geoff Head created the ten linocuts of Gladstone buildings that are now displayed on Goondoon St.

Gladstone artist Geoff Head explains where his idea came from to create linocuts of...

Ken cheers up Barnaby

Professor Owen Niven with deputy prime minister Barnaby Joyce and Ken O'Dowd.

Ken O'Dowd's slip of the tongue cheered up deputy premier Barnaby Joyce this...

Three bedroom, 1100sqm block: Is this Qld's cheapest home?

BARGAIN BUY: Is this North Bundaberg property the cheapest home in Queensland?

Becoming a real estate mogul is all about risk and reward

PROPERTY BOOM: Coast prices set to skyrocket

Like other areas in south-east Queensland, the Sunshine Coast is at the start of the upturn on the property clock.

Values predicted to rise 25-33%