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Community to capture photographs of Gladstone king tide

WITH king tides reaching the Gladstone coast on January 12, Green Cross Australia and the Gladstone Regional Council are encouraging coastal communities to photograph their local king tide to highlight the impact of rising sea levels as part of the Witness King Tides project.

Witness King Tides is an initiative that will help Australians understand the impacts of sea level rise in their local area.

Gladstone residents can witness nearby king tides on January 12, 2013 at 9:33am.

Green Cross Australia CEO Mara Bún said sharing photos allowed people to visualise how flooding from rising sea levels will impact our beaches, coastal areas and shoreline communities in the future.

"Witness King Tides will help us to identify and understand the impacts of rising sea levels on our beaches, coastal areas and shoreline communities," Ms Bún said.

"Through gathering and sharing visual data, we raise awareness around Australia and can adapt for the future." Ms Bún said. 

"Around 85 percent of Queensland's population lives within 50km of the coast, so we are encouraging as many residents as possible to become aware of what to expect in the future.

"We're excited to be rolling this campaign out around the whole of Australia this year, with the Queensland pilot program a great success during the last summer king tides.

Although king tides are naturally occurring, the bi-annual occurrence provides an insight into the potential impacts of rising sea levels to the Australian coastline.

Project partners include CSIRO, Australian Coastal Society, National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility and the Bleach Festival.

The NSW Office of Environment and Heritage, the Tasmanian Climate Change Office and numerous coastal and estuarine councils around Australia fund the project. 

The Gladstone Regional Council is also providing funding support to the Witness King Tides project.

To get involved go to www.witnesskingtides.org

Fast facts

  • Witness King Tides is an initiative by Green Cross Australia, run nationally for the first time in the 2012/13 king tides season.
  • The project aims to generate awareness of sea level rise by creating a visual database of what our coasts may look like in the future
  • Coastal communities are encouraged to take photos king tides and upload them to the online portal to share with others.

Topics:  king tides, photography




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